The Truth About Lies (2008 Edition)

$ 9.95

Fresh New Look at the Cunning of Evil
And the Means For Our Transformation

Description

“I’ve been waiting for someone to approach spiritual formation, recovery and inner healing in an integrated way. This is it! In doing so, David Takle has described how interactive life with God grows and results in transformation into Christlikeness.”
— Jan Johnson, retreat speaker and author of Invitation to the Jesus Life

The truth will set you free? Then why am I still carrying around all this pain? Why am I still stuck in my walk with the Lord? What is wrong with me, and why does the Christian life seem so illusive?

Difficult as these questions can be, many Christians today find themselves in the position where their journey toward an authentic life with God has slowed down to a crawl or stopped altogether, with no bridge and no way forward in sight. Tragically, the very ideals many Christians depend on for spiritual growth are actually their greatest source of bondage! Deeply tied to this problem of stagnation is a pervasive misunderstanding and mishandling of Truth that has distorted an undermined Christian practice throughout the history of the Church.

Beyond traditional models of discipleship, beyond inner healing prayer, The Truth About Lies and Lies About Truth describes the foundations you need for renewing your mind and building a relationship with your heavenly Mentor that will transform your life. Some of the topics covered are:

  • Why Christian Education fails to produce adequate change
  • When being more committed will not help
  • How the misuse of truth can create bondage instead of freedom
  • How most discipleship models actually make life harder

Check out our dedicated website for more information on this amazing book.

If you want the Kindle version, please see The Revised Edition.

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Additional information

Weight 14.5 oz
Dimensions 9 x 6 x .5 in

1 review for The Truth About Lies (2008 Edition)

  1. Collected reviews

    Collected reviews

    Posted: 2009-02-18
    I think this work is one of the best pieces of writing and wisdom that has ever come to the Body of Christ … I pray your book will gain a wide readership, as it explains why so many people are falling away from the organized church … because it seems so impotent in the face of personal and cultural problems and meltdown. Your book pulls back the curtain, and the wizard (or should I say lizard??) is exposed. Thanks for opening the curtain … so the Light can expose what is truly there behind it all.
    —Blair S Morgan, Atty. Spring Hill, TN

    Posted: 2009-01-19
    This is a thought provoking and relevant book. It clarified a lot of issues in my mind. In particular, I’ve heard many times in the past 3 years about establishing a personal relationship with God through meditation and daily prayer, but I didn’t know how to actually do those things. The pastor would say, “And we all need to keep our close relationship and personal dialogue with God” and everybody nodded, but nobody seemed to point to the 800lb gorilla in the room (at least to me), which was “HOW DO I DO THAT? WHAT DO I SAY? DO I ACTUALLY HEAR SOMETHING BACK? IN MY HEAD OR IS IT OUT LOUD…” I didn’t know how to execute and the gulf between where I am and where the other people at church nod their heads affirming where they are is HUGE. These prescriptive chapters helped me understand what that conversation can look like. I’ve also struggled with the seeming contradiction I observe in friends who’ve been loyal followers for many years, but look haggard, tired, and spent in their followership. That doesn’t jive with the jubilation they’re “supposed” to feel. This book help me (and I hope them) understand why they get tired – and why Christianity doesn’t have to be an exhausting, endless struggle. I am better as a Christian and as a person for reading this book.
    —Jeff Boston, MA

    Posted: 2009-01-17
    Knowing Scripture, walking in power gifts or tremendous anointings, or knowing Godly priciples are all good things. But they don’t equip a person to cope with hard really hard times, like that depicted in Isaiah 33, as “…their brave men cry in the streets.” If, just when my world needs me to lead them to God, I fall apart, too, what good is it that?
    As leader of a local church inner healing/ministry training ministry, I want my people to have practice in believing God’s sovereignty and goodness deeply in their beings. What a person really believes is exposed by how they react to difficult situations:
    -Usually a person’s first response to a frightening situation is “Oh my gosh! This bad thing is going to happen, then that bad thing….” -A more mature person may follow that with practical ideas, “Well, if I do this, it will keep it from getting any worse. Then I could fix that…”
    -Many mature Christians would then think, “Let’s see: God is good. He can make good come from this. I need to keep repeating those kinds of scriptures to build up my faith. Gosh, this is an awful mess!” But I want me and my people to come into the challenging times with our FIRST reflex being to cry out to God, with a deep inner confidence/hope that God is good, a conviction of His unseen loving hand here, and a “not-to-worry: He has it together” attitude. Isaiah 33 labels it as Him being strength every morning, the stability of our times, a wealth of rescuing actions, wisdom and knowledge. This reflexive crying out to God with confidence is only going to come as the deep inner actual lie-beliefs are systematically and purposefully swapped out for Truth.
    David has written a book that, first, labels and delineates what the problem is, so we can identify where we need help. His explanations and illustrations make it easier to understand how these concepts apply to me. He then gets down to practical details about what does (and doesn’t!) work to accomplish this transformation process. I have read (at least parts of) many of the sources he has drawn from, and I find his distillation of the concepts, and examples of practical clues to watch for, much more understandable to me, to help me identify where I am in this process.
    Lori Wright, Healing Hearts, Community of Grace
    —Lori Wright Hayward CA

    Posted: 2009-01-14
    David Takle brings together three worlds that I believe are interrelated yet seldom spoken of in the same breath (or book): spiritual formation, recovery and inner healing. Readers may not realize he has accomplished this feat because he addresses his basic topic of transformation so seamlessly through well-worded explanations, excellent examples and simple diagrams that make the process relatively easy to understand. What brings it down to earth is that he compares this process with what he calls “faulty approaches to spiritual development.” These are formulas heard every day in Christian circles and frequent thoughts in many Christians’ minds. Readers are gently moved forward from these destructive ways of thinking so they can feel that trusting God deeply and dialoguing with God are not only normal but quite possible.
    –Jan Johnson, retreat speaker and author of Invitation to the Jesus Life and Savoring God’s Word
    —Jan Johnson Simi Valley, CA

    Posted: 2009-01-08
    David, Thank you for the book. I have read it and enjoyed it thoroughly. I bought several copies and am going to give some to friends and family and sell some to colleagues and counselors that I know. It was an excellent and thought provoking book for me. I had some moments when I had to stop and think through what you were saying and admit that deception has taken place and correction through God’s word and the Holy Spirit is needed (and in process, I hope).
    The idea that transformation can still take place and that it is and needs to be an ongoing process is well stated and encouraging to me. I have long thought that we begin here and carry on and continue to grow when we get into God’s presence and since we have eternity to progress God is willing to let us come as we are and continue the journey we have begun on earth. I believe He rewards us with His pleasure when we are some distance on the road when we get there. Your idea that the Holy Spirit is a willing and joyful teacher was a refreshing thought and obviously true. I had just never thought about it just that way.
    Your writing style is just right for me. I felt that I was tracking with you all along the way through the book. I encourage you to keep writing because you present your ideas very clearly in print. God is using you to “tell the truth about truth” in a great way. I have heard of Dallas Willard but have not read any of his books yet. It sounds like I should. I look forward to hearing from you or seeing you again sometime soon.
    Thanks again, Cliff Sexton
    —Cliff Sexton Modesto, CA

    Posted: 2008-12-20
    David Takle’s book is a must read for anyone interested in growing deeper in their walk with Christ. Takle begins by offering a coherent explanation of the extent, deception influences, and shapes our lives. He paints a picture of the enormous extent of malformation and deception we all struggle with and do not even realize. Using plenty of examples, Takle writes in such a gentle, caring way; I read this information without becoming defensive or feeling worse about myself. But that is not the end of the book. Rather, Takle then focuses on the ways God provides for our healing, growth and transformation into the image of Christ. He describes the wonderful heart of God and how we can get that truth beyond our minds and into our hearts. One point I found personally so powerful was the fact that God really enjoys the process of our transformation. God is not bothered by the length of time we take to grow/heal or the depth of deception in our lives. David clearly explains how we can encounter God and experience His truth in our hearts. He also describes a new role for prayer, scripture, the Holy Spirit, the community as we try to grow in the security of God’s love. I was so encouraged and excited by the opportunities available to encounter God and grow in His love. I felt strengthened to face the brokenness and deceptions in me. Now instead of producing discouragement and despair, they are further opportunities to encounter Jesus and be restored. This turns a painful process into one filled with hope. I found this book so helpful. I really appreciated the encouraging tone of the book. I love this book and recommend it highly. I intend to buy it for all my Christian friends.
    —Laurie Kayne Lawrenceville, NJ

    Posted: 2008-12-14
    David Takle in his book has taken on the difficult task of making sense about the cunning way deception works. Within the pages of The Truth About Lies and the Lies About Truth, David Takle confronts the issue of how lies and deception frame our beliefs about almost everything. How it works in our culture, in our religious institutions and most importantly in our personal beliefs about ourselves, about who we are. As I read David’s book, I found that the more intense my personal vulnerabilities are, the greater becomes the perceived need to conceal the truth. First to conceal the truth and then to actually come to believe it. David, thank you for the years you have spent in finding a non-threatening way for us to better understand ourselves as human beings and the children of God, the Creator.
    —Gary W White Bear Lake, MN

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